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Events, Webinars & Activism

Upcoming Events

Check back for more events soon!

Webinars

Here you will find webinars that we think you will find interesting.  These are not PAR of CNY events.

Gene Delivery Approach with AMH for Single-Dose Lifetime Contraception in Female Cats

On September 21, 2023 the Botstiber Institute for Wildlife Fertility Control (BIWFC) presented a webinar on ecent study of a novel non-surgical contraceptive for female domestic cats. Learn more and watch the video by visiting this link.

Farm Bill (EATS Act)

Every five years, Congress must reauthorize the Farm Bill, which governs a wide range of agricultural issues and has significant implications for animals. Join Campaigns Manager Matt Rossell and Strategic Legislative Affairs Manager Alicia Prygoski as they discuss the 2023 Farm Bill process, what we may see as Congress continues to develop this legislation, and how to get involved to advocate for a Farm Bill that prioritizes animal protection.

 

Ending the USDA's 'milk mandate' in schools and providing a plant-based option for kids

In this webinar, participants will learn about the extent of lactose-intolerance among school children, the lives of dairy cows, and the common-sense solution that is now in Congress as the ADD SOY Act — a bill that would require the USDA to fund a nutritionally equivalent soy beverage to any student who asks for it.

Watch it on YouTube

 

image of a coyote

Rewilding with Beavers- Improving hydrology, biodiversity, and climate resiliency Heartland Rewilding 11 subscribers Subscribe

This wonderful webinar from Heartland Rewilding’s Connect the Heartland series features Bob Boucher from Superior Bio-Conservancy. The webinar explores the fascinating world of beavers and their role in improving hydrology, biodiversity, and climate resiliency. Beavers are the ultimate rewilders, and their recovery across North America would help us recover wild nature and create a future where humans and nature thrive. 

Read about it here

image of a coyote

Rethinking Wildlife Management in the United States

Join Project Coyote on April 25th featuring Project Coyote’s Carnivore Conservation Director, Dr. Michelle Lute, and Wildlife for All Executive Director, Kevin Bixby. They will explain how the current system of wildlife is itself a barrier to achieving coexistence with wild creatures and meaningful biodiversity protection. They will discuss how this outdated and entrenched system is built on an ethic of domination and exploitation, intended mainly to serve consumptive users (hunters, anglers and trappers), dismissive of other values and voices, not based on sound science, and must be changed to prevent extinctions, promote democracy and protect wildlife. 


 

YouTube Videos

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Activism

Read a selection of articles that offer ways you can become a better advocate for the animals.

Don't Leave Your Companion Animal in a Parked Car

Advice below adapted from the Humane Society of the U.S. (www.hsus.org)

1. On a warm day, the temperature in a parked car can reach 120
degrees in minutes – even with the windows partly open.

2. A companion animal can quickly suffer brain damage or die from
heatstroke or suffocation in these conditions.

3. Signs of heat stress: heavy panting, glazed eyes, rapid pulse,
unsteadiness, staggering, vomiting, deep red or purple tongue.

4. If your companion animal becomes overheated, begin immediate
steps to lower her/his temperature as follows:

* Move her/him to the shade and apply cool (not cold) water over entire body to gradually lower temperature;

* Apply ice packs or cold towels – to head, neck and chest
only;

* Offer her/him small amounts of cool water or let her/him
lick ice cubes;

* Take her/him to a vet immediately; this could save her/
his life.

5. If you see an animal in a parked car alone on a hot day, try to
find the animal’s person right away. If necessary, call animal
control or the police or 911.

6. Another reason to avoid leaving your companion animal in a car
alone is that a thief might steal her/him.

7. When traveling in a vehicle, cats should be in a carrier and
dogs should be in a dog harness.

8. Each animal should have ID, such as a tattoo or chip.

RESOURCE: You can request cards with similar information that are easy to stick under a windshield wiper. Request from People for Animal Rights or from Red Rover at redrover.org

ANOTHER RESOURCE: You can order from Animal Legal Defense Fund a car sunshade with the words: “Don’t Leave Dogs in Hot Cars. Call 911 to report trapped dogs.” It is flexible and durable. Go to aldf.org/hotcars

Hidden Danger: Keep Your Pet Safe from Electric Shock

(From ASPCA) Winter’s chill may have settled in your neighborhood, but your energetic pooch still wants to go for walks in the great outdoors. Take it slow and steady, pet parents. According to our experts, the danger of stray voltage on city streets can turn a simple stroll into a devastating event for our furry friends.

Most common in northern climes and urban areas, stray voltage occurs when dormant utilities leak excess electricity. Combined with wet streets and salt-based ice melts, this current can shock, injure or even prove fatal for those in its path. “Since salt used to treat icy streets is a great conductor of electricity,” says Dr. Louise Murray, ASPCA Director of Medicine and author of Vet Confidential, “the risk of shock from stray voltage is that much higher during the winter months.” The ASPCA offers the following tips to help you avoid potentially hazardous areas, and advice on what to do if your pet has suffered an electrical shock:

Keep your dog away from metal fixtures, such as lampposts, grates or manhole covers. While these spots may be your pet’s favorite place to relieve himself, they may also conduct hazardous electricity.

Your dog’s snazzy, rubber rain boots may look good, but they won’t protect your pooch from a strong current. Don’t depend on them to keep your pet safe. Some boots—those with metal studs, for example—may even make the situation worse.

Observe your dog’s behavior. Is he skittish, frightened, angry or upset for no apparent reason? These sudden behavioral changes could be an indication of electric shock.

If your dog is incapacitated due to shock, don’t try to touch or move him without protective gear. Your pooch may pass the current to you, rendering you both incapable of seeking help. Instead, call your local fire department immediately.

If you don't want to cause unnecessary suffering and death to animals, please avoid these items:

Fur – whether a full-length coat or trim on a jacket or gloves or toys;

Leather (animal skin)

Wool

Down

Products tested on animals. You can learn what companies do NOT test on animals by going to peta2.com and looking for their list of cruelty-free companies and products.

Why not fur? Because fur is obtained by killing animals – and in very painful ways. Some animals are caught in steeljaw, leghold traps, which shut on their limbs with brutal force, and the animal may suffer for days before finally being killed by the trapper. Other animals are confined to small, filthy cages on fur farms, where they can go insane from boredom and fear and even self-mutilate. Death is often done by anal electrocution. And then there are the seals who are clubbed to death.

Why not leather? Besides coming from some wild animals (such as deer), leather comes from the skin of cows, calves, horses, sheep, lambs, goats, pigs and even dogs and cats (this may be the case if the product comes from Asia). Almost all these animals suffer confinement, crowding, branding, as well as unanesthetized castration, dehorning and tail-docking.

Why not wool? Much wool comes from Australia, where sheep are kept in huge flocks and are cut (without anesthesia) around the tail area to prevent infestation with blowflys. The shearing process is done with such speed and force (given the large number of animals) that the sheep suffer cuts and experience fear.

Why not down? Down is plucked painfully from living ducks and geese.

Besides choosing gifts which avoid the above cruelties, you could even take a positive step to help animals by giving a gift which promotes healthy, compassionate eating – such as a gift certificate to Strong Hearts Cafe.

Strong Hearts Cafe is a popular all-vegan restaurant in Syracuse and offers sandwiches salads, soups, shakes, tea, coffee and fabulous desserts. See
strongheartscafe.com

Winter Will Be Cold For Our Dogs, Too

(By Lou De Santis) November 28th is Fur Free Friday, an event that began over twenty years ago in this country and is now observed throughout the world. By the 1990’s, after exposing the brutality of fur production, animal advocates had succeeded in making the wearing of fur taboo in the eyes of many people. Recently, to counter this, department stores have been promoting clothing with fur collars and trim that consumers mistakenly believe is made from scraps of leftover fur. In reality, animals suffer and die for each article, whether fur-trimmed or full length. And that death is not pretty.

In the U.S., nearly four million animals are caught in traps where they suffer for days before trappers break their necks or even bludgeon them to death. Throughout the world, an estimated 45 million animals will spend their lives in small cages on”fur farms”. These animals’ short, miserable lives are ended by such cruel methods as gassing, neck-breaking and anal-electrocution. In China, where most of the West’s fur comes from, animals such as foxes, raccoons, cats and dogs are, unbelievably, skinned alive.

Fur trimmed items are now a half-billion dollar industry. The number of animals killed for fur trim is soon expected to overtake those killed for full-fur garments.

The holidays are meant to be a time of peace and kindness. Shouldn’t that compassion extend to our fashion decisions?

Avoid All Fur, Including Fur Trim

(By Lou De Santis) November 28th is Fur Free Friday, an event that began over twenty years ago in this country and is now observed throughout the world. By the 1990’s, after exposing the brutality of fur production, animal advocates had succeeded in making the wearing of fur taboo in the eyes of many people. Recently, to counter this, department stores have been promoting clothing with fur collars and trim that consumers mistakenly believe is made from scraps of leftover fur. In reality, animals suffer and die for each article, whether fur-trimmed or full length. And that death is not pretty.

In the U.S., nearly four million animals are caught in traps where they suffer for days before trappers break their necks or even bludgeon them to death. Throughout the world, an estimated 45 million animals will spend their lives in small cages on”fur farms”. These animals’ short, miserable lives are ended by such cruel methods as gassing, neck-breaking and anal-electrocution. In China, where most of the West’s fur comes from, animals such as foxes, raccoons, cats and dogs are, unbelievably, skinned alive.

Fur trimmed items are now a half-billion dollar industry. The number of animals killed for fur trim is soon expected to overtake those killed for full-fur garments.

The holidays are meant to be a time of peace and kindness. Shouldn’t that compassion extend to our fashion decisions?